Twice I dreamed of a group of people who danced around a bonfire under the stars at nighttime. They dressed as early Native Americans, in loincloths, beads, leggings and feathers. Two of the dancers wore headdresses that had long extensions on either side of the crown, extending upward. The next morning, I googled “shamanic headdress” and the headdress of an Evenk Tribe shaman appeared.

My psychic friend told me that if I go back to the ceremony, one of the shamans might come up to me and look me directly in the face, and that would be me. In a past-life regression meditation, I returned to the ceremony, and sure enough, one of the dancers in the headdress came up to me and looked into my face from only inches away.

It was me from many lifetimes and thousands of years ago, looking at me of today. He was a young man, a shaman in training, and he wanted to know what message I held for him.

I was so thrilled I could only laugh with joy and excitement, and enthusiastically shake hands with the young shaman-in-training. I blurted out my identity, high-fived the confused young man and gushed with meaningless words of “great to meet you, can’t believe I’m here, nobody’s going to believe this….” His reaction was understandable. In a language I couldn’t follow but with a tone and facial expression I couldn’t misunderstand, he told me that I was wasting his time, that he had no interest in interacting with me, and that I was never to come visit him again. His anger towards me was evident. I took issue with these words and told him so, and I left.

It took me a few days to process the encounter, my emotions growing from indignation to hurt feelings, then finally understanding where he was coming from. Along with the more senior shaman members of his tribe, he was performing a ceremony specifically designed to bring in spirits…and I was one of those spirits who felt the call and showed up at their ceremony! And what a disappointment I was to the young shaman who was me so long ago. He was embarrassed to be associated with such a flippant spirit as I portrayed when we met during his ceremony.

I began thinking about what I could possibly teach the young shaman, if I returned to his ceremony, something that would convince him that his spirit essence had matured significantly in the many lives and thousands of years since he danced his “calling-spirits” dance around the fire so long ago.

So after deciding what to do, I returned through meditation to the calling-in-the-spirits ceremony. I expressed words of comfort and reassurance to the young shaman as I took his hand, and he and I floated up from the surface of the Earth together. As we rose, we saw the other shamans dancing around the bonfire below us, then we saw the entire village, and on and on until Earth’s continents and oceans could be seen.

The young shaman’s eyes grew wider and wider as he took in the vista, barely remembering to breathe as we floated upwards. Soon we passed the moon as we moved towards the sun, passing Venus and Mercury on the way. We circled the sun and then began moving outward past each planet in turn, continuing to Pluto and the end of our Solar System. We traveled far beyond the Solar System and approached the Milky Way, where the young shaman cried out in amazement to see that the Milky Way was made up of individual stars. And we continued away from the stars to a dark space, and looked back to see our galaxy, an immense pinwheel of stars. Looking around, we saw an infinite number of other galaxies spread throughout space, some nearer, some farther.

We then reversed our journey, returning to the Solar System and then to Earth. The young shaman was silenced with awe, and could only mumble his thanks to me, for our journey into the heavens had opened his mind to possibilities never before imagined.

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R. Merle Adams
R. (Rick) Merle Adams' past experience spans 30 years in developing advertising for some of the world's largest brands. His programs have received national and international recognition, including the advertising industry's top creative awards, and have been used as case histories in creative and marketing textbooks. Rick was selected by Advertising Age as one of the "100 Best and Brightest People in Advertising."

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