True Gratitude: Nothing to Hide Behind

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The following Bright Beautiful School of Thought saying shares a very healthful perspective: “If there is a heaven, a ‘key to the universe,’ even a sixth sense, they are rooted in true honesty, true happiness and true freedom, but most importantly, there is nothing to hide behind. It is a glimpse of an existence where there is no time, no space, no distance…all is known, and once again, there is nothing to hide behind.”

What can we do with this bit of knowledge? Is it the right thing for the right selfless sake? How honest do we want to be with ourselves? This can be tough stuff. From this perspective, does much of what we so often think is so important in our daily lives really all that important? Maybe there are lots of things that are so much more important.

We can healthfully learn to witness this truth: that the silly things that we often act like, and think are so important, may not hold a candle to the genuinely substantive things that are truly of immeasurable importance. Witnessing the truth as such is a bright beautiful thing: being genuinely in a splendidly healthful spirit of true appreciation — with gratitude for each breath, for each moment and for all of the innumerable blessings and miracles that we so often blindly take for granted.

These notions are quite congruent with honestly and mindfully seeking to avoid hiding from the truth.

What are the things that each of us tends to hide behind? How honest are we willing to be? How happy do we want to be? How much can we handle? Do we want to acknowledge that we are hiding? Do we want to face the things we hide behind? This outlook is quite consistent with the true and healthful view that we, as human beings, are NOT as separate/separated as we commonly think.

During the Covid-19 crisis, we are facing a dilemma that at times forces us to look within ourselves in a fashion that may be quite new to us. How good or uncomfortable does it make each of us feel, to look deeply within, to work toward deep objective insight? Sometimes this is more obvious when we face what most certainly is an existential crisis.

In this turning point, we have two choices: make the world a better place — or tear it down. Historically we have come together and set forth our finest effort when we have faced huge, disconcerting problems. Wouldn’t the world be a much better place the more we work to do the right thing for the right sake, selflessly? Isn’t it a significant aspect of taking true responsibility for our own health and well-being?

Isn’t this in the splendid and honest spirit of living in true appreciation and gratitude? There likely isn’t anything more important.

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